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The Most Iconic Hats in TV and Film History

When it comes to hat-related fashion, nothing beats the characters of our favorite TV shows and movies. While there has been plenty of high-class headwear worn on screen, we’re counting down five of the most iconic hats in TV and film history.

Rick Blane’s Fedora—Casablanca

We have expressed our love for Indiana Jones’ Fedora before. But before Indy risked his hand to save a fedora from a closing door, Rick Blane wore one on the tarmac to bid farewell to the love of his life.

Humphrey Bogart’s character wasn’t the first to sport this creased, wide-brimmed hat, but he is one of the most iconic. The hat and trench coat combo embodied the time period’s style, and people continue to pay homage to it to this very day.

The Lone Ranger’s Stetson—The Lone Ranger

The Western genre has a long and illustrious list of cowboys wearing a colorful collection of Stetsons. While we have to appreciate Hoss’ hat from Bonanza or any of the dozens that Gene Autry sported, we have to give this spot to one of the most famous lawmen on TV: the Lone Ranger.

Ranger Reid helped solidify many of the classic cowboy hero tropes, and one of them is the idea of the white hat-wearing cowboy. This undoubtedly makes his one of the more iconic hats from TV and film as far as Westerns go.

Eliza Doolittle’s Derby Hat—My Fair Lady

Horse races are famous for their elegant and outrageously ostentatious hats. So it’s no surprise that the 400 costumes featured in the “Ascot Gavotte” sequence in My Fair Lady include some almost hilarious headwear. And none are more eye-catching than protagonist Eliza Doolittle’s hat.

The plumed hat, made of cotton burlap and velvet, is arguably one of the most memorable costume pieces of the movie and shines in many of the movie’s posters.

The Mad Hatter’s Top Hat—Alice in Wonderland

Whether you mean the book or one of the movie adaptations, you can’t deny that Alice in Wonderland has pervaded popular culture. And few figures are as memorable as the Mad Hatter. Even so, most don’t realize that he and his hat are a historic pun.

When Lewis Carroll wrote the novel in 1865, hatters made top hats with mercury. Because of that, hatters would often contract mercury poisoning, which caused “insane” behaviors, leading to the expression “mad as a hatter.” Either way, the top hat look has become a favorite for those wanting to embrace a little bit of “madness” in their style.

Tommy Shelby’s Flat Cap—Peaky Blinders

This list has featured splendid hats, but none can claim to also function as a weapon like the Peaky Blinder’s flat caps. This post-WWI-era Irish gang gets their name from sewing razor blades into the brims of their hat, making them useful in an unexpected fight.

But thanks to the style of gang leader Tommy Shelby, men’s flat cap hats are seeing a comeback in modern fashion: razor blades not included.